Aluminum Radiators

Aluminum Radiators

Aluminum Radiators

Gireesh Heat Transfer offers a wide range of brazed aluminum radiator styles and options. From small individual coolers to large complex engine cooling systems, from heavy duty bar and plate construction to plastic tank radiators, we have the right design for your mobile or industrial application. Our engineering team is continually developing additional fin geometries to improve heat transfer efficiency so we can meet or exceed your expectations.

Brazed Bar and Plate Radiators

Fins are laid between aluminum braze sheets and fitted with header and face bars. The assembled unit is placed into one of our modern brazing furnaces where precise control of time and temperature produces a unified core. Manifolds designed to meet each customer’s particular piping requirements are welded into place to complete the radiator.

  • Ideal for heavy duty mobile and industrial applications
  • Feature a wide variety of thermally efficient internal and external fin patterns
  • Rugged, compact, lightweight units
  • Infinite number of core configurations and sizes to custom design a solution specifically to your exact requirements
  • Combi-cooler designs are available to cool multiple fluids in a single brazed unit
  • Available as component cooler or packaged as a complete cooling system incorporating radiator and/or charge air cooler with oil cooler components

TBAR  Radiators

Our patented TBAR replaces hot fins and bars with a single extruded tube for increased product durability.

  • Highly flexible design
  • Enhanced extruded tubes for improved charge air cooling
  • Patented tube-to-bar joint ensures consistent brazing
  • Extruded tubes provide unrivaled durability and fewer leak paths
  • High-efficiency louvered fins for enhanced heat rejection
  • Wide variety of debris resistant non-louvered fins
  • Welded tank to core for a long leak-free service life
  • Zinc-infused aluminum materials for unrivaled corrosion protection
  • Low charge-air side pressure drop
  • Stands up to heavy thermal cycle loads

Tube and Header Radiators

Our brazed aluminum tube and header radiators offer a cost effective, lightweight solution for stationary and mobile engine cooling applications. Radiators can be provided as a stand alone component, but most often would be combined with our bar and plate oil coolers and charge air cooler to form a complete engine cooling solution.

  • Wide range of row depths
  • Variety of external fins to match different environmental conditions
  • Tanks designed to meet piping requirements and are welded into place for superior integrity
  • Welded aluminum tanks can be fabricated, stamped or cast depending on application and volume

Aluminum Radiators

Aluminum Radiators

Aluminum Radiators

For other uses, see Radiator (disambiguation).
Radiators are heat exchangers used for cooling internal combustion engines, mainly in automobiles but also in piston-engined aircraft, railway locomotives, motorcycles, stationary generating plant or any similar use of such an engine.
Internal combustion engines are often cooled by circulating a liquid called engine coolant through the engine block, where it is heated, then through a radiator where it loses heat to the atmosphere, and then returned to the engine. Engine coolant is usually water-based, but may also be oil. It is common to employ a water pump to force the engine coolant to circulate, and also for an axial fan to force air through the radiator.
Automobile radiators are constructed of a pair of header tanks, linked by a core with many narrow passageways, giving a high surface area relative to volume. This core is usually made of stacked layers of metal sheet, pressed to form channels and soldered or brazed together. For many years radiators were made from brass or copper cores soldered to brass headers. Modern radiators have aluminum cores, and often save money and weight by using plastic headers. This construction is more prone to failure and less easily repaired than traditional materials.
An earlier construction method was the honeycomb radiator. Round tubes were swaged into hexagons at their ends, then stacked together and soldered. As they only touched at their ends, this formed what became in effect a solid water tank with many air tubes through it.
Radiators first used downward vertical flow, driven solely by a the mosyphon effect. Coolant is heated in the engine, becomes less dense, and so rises. As the radiator cools the fluid, the coolant becomes denser and falls. This effect is sufficient for low-power stationary engines, but inadequate for all but the earliest automobiles. All automobiles for many years have used centrifugal pumps to circulate the engine coolant because natural circulation has very low flow rates.
Some vintage cars use radiator cores made from coiled tube, a less efficient but simpler construction